Editor’s Picks

11

Managing Quality of Life in Tourism and Hospitality

Edited by M Uysal, Professor & Dept. Chair. University of Massachusetts Amherst, USA, M J Sirgy, Virginia Polytechnic Institute and State University, USA, S Kruger, North-West University, South Africa October 2018 / Hardback

Quality-of-life research in tourism and hospitality has gained much momentum in the past two decades. This line of research covers three main areas of focus: (i) the impacts of specific tourism and hospitality programs on the overall quality of life of tourists/guests; (ii) the providers of goods and services; (iii) tourist communities, including the impact of different programs and events on the quality of life of residents in these communities.

Focusing on these key subjects, Managing Quality of Life in Tourism and Hospitality provides a portfolio of selected cases showing best practice and delivering them to the forefront of knowledge application, with examples in tourism and hospitality settings. Best practice case studies are included throughout, providing practical implications and lessons learned. These lessons can be applied by tourism and hospitality practitioners and community leaders, and be used to further research by academics working within tourism and hospitality.

The book offers an exciting and refreshing approach to quality-of-life research in tourism and hospitality.

Key features include:
– Best practice and evidence-based case studies.

The Real Cost of “Cosmetic Tourism” Cost Analysis Study of “Cosmetic Tourism” Complications Presenting to a Public Hospital

By Ryan Livingston, Paul Berlund, Jade Eccles- Smith, and Raja Sawhney Published July 28, 2015 in Eplasty

“Cosmetic Tourism,” the process of traveling overseas for cosmetic procedures, is an expanding global phenomenon. The model of care by which these services are delivered can limit perioperative assessment and postoperative follow-up. Researchers’ aim was to establish the number and type of complications being treated by a secondary referral hospital resulting from “cosmetic tourism” and the cost that has been incurred by the hospital in a 1-year period. Retrospective cost analysis and chart review of patients admitted to the hospital between the financial year of 2012 and 2013 were performed. Twelve “cosmetic tourism” patients presented to the hospital, requiring admission during the study period. Breast augmentation was the most common procedure and infected prosthesis was the most common complication (n = 4). Complications ranged from infection, pulmonary embolism to penile necrosis.

The average cost of treating these patients was $AUD 12 597.71. The overall financial burden of the complication to the hospital was AUD$151 172.52. The “cosmetic tourism” model of care appears to be, in some cases, suboptimal for patients and their regional hospitals. In the cases presented in this study, it appears that care falls on the patient local hospital and home country to deal with the complications from their surgery abroad.

This incurs a financial cost to that hospital in addition to redirecting medical resources that would otherwise be utilized for treating noncosmetic complications, without any remuneration to the local provider.

Cosmetic surgery tourism characterizes a phenomenon of people traveling abroad for aesthetic surgery treatment. Problems arise when patients return with complications or need of follow-up care.

The study conducted for investigating the complications of cosmetic surgery tourism treated at University Hospital Zurich as well as to analyze arising costs for the health system.

Between 2010 and 2014, they retrospectively included all patients presenting with complications arising from cosmetic surgery abroad. They reviewed medical records for patients’ characteristics including performed operations, complications, and treatment. Associated cost expenditure and Diagnose Related Groups (DRG)-related reimbursement were analyzed.

Results:
In total 109 patients were identified. All patients were female with a mean age of 38.5 ± 11.3 years. Most procedures were performed in South America (43%) and Southeast (29.4%) or central Europe (24.8%), respectively. Favored procedures were breast augmentation (39.4%), abdominoplasty (11%), and breast reduction (7.3%). Median time between the initial procedure abroad and presentation was 15 days (interquartile range [IQR], 9) for early, 81.5 days (IQR, 69.5) for midterm, and 4.9 years (IQR, 9.4) for late complications. Main complications were infections (25.7%), wound breakdown (19.3%), and pain/discomfort (14.7%). The majority of patients (63.3%) were treated conservatively; 34.8% became inpatients with a mean hospital stay of 5.2 ± 3.8 days. Overall DRG-related reimbursement premiums approximately covered the total costs.

Conclusions:
Despite warnings regarding associated risks, cosmetic surgery tourism has become increasingly popular. Efficient patients’ referral to secondary/ tertiary care centers with standardized evaluation and treatment can limit arising costs without imposing a too large burden on the social healthcare system. – Broad coverage that includes tourists, industry and local communities. – International application, with material from various countries across the world.

Medical tourism and its implications for patients and hospital services throughout the world

[Article in Danish] by Hansen KS Ugeskr Laeger. 2017 May 15;179(20)

This article provides a snapshot of global medical tourism and its positive and negative implications for healthcare around the world presented through selected examples. Medical tourism is an old phenomenon which has seen a rapid increase due to global technological advances thus enabling people to receive treatment anywhere in the world, often combined with a tropical vacation. Treatments are of a non-acute, voluntary nature and are driven largely by high prices and long waiting lists at the home countries and low prices and high service quality at the destination country.

Global Wellness Economy Monitor

Executive Summary October 2018

By The Global Wellness Institute (GWI)

This report, prepared with the data of 2017 after the report prepared by GWI in 2015, provides important information about the sectoral growth in the 2-year period. The executive summary report containing important data for the global wellness economy is very important for all stakeholders who want to take a role in this sector.

According to the report, a total of 830 million trips were made in 2017 for the wellness tourism in the classical sense and in return, the expenditure was $ 639.4 billion. The average spending per capita was $ 1,528 for those traveling overseas and $ 609 for domestic individuals. The expenditures made due to the services provided by utilizing thermal resources are stated in the report as a total of $ 56.2 billion in 2017.

Here is the link for “Global Wellness Economy Monitor Executive Summary October 2018”

Complications After Cosmetic Surgery Tourism

Holger J. Klein, MD Dario Simic Nina Fuchs, MD Riccardo Schweizer, MDTarun Mehra, MD Pietro Giovanoli, MD Jan A. Plock, MD

Aesthetic Surgery Journal, Volume 37, Issue 4, 1 April 2017, Pages 474–482, https://doi.org/10.1093/asj/sjw198

Results:
Background & Objectives:

Cosmetic surgery tourism characterizes a phenomenon of people traveling abroad for aesthetic surgery treatment. Problems arise when patients return with complications or need of follow-up care.

The study conducted for investigating the complications of cosmetic surgery tourism treated at University Hospital Zurich as well as to analyze arising costs for the health system. Between 2010 and 2014, they retrospectively included all patients presenting with complications arising from cosmetic surgery abroad. They reviewed medical records for patients’ characteristics including performed operations, complications, and treatment. Associated cost expenditure and Diagnose Related Groups (DRG)-related reimbursement were analyzed.

Results:
In total 109 patients were identified. All patients were female with a mean age of 38.5 ± 11.3 years. Most procedures were performed in South America (43%) and Southeast (29.4%) or central Europe (24.8%), respectively. Favored procedures were breast augmentation (39.4%), abdominoplasty (11%), and breast reduction (7.3%). Median time between the initial procedure abroad and presentation was 15 days (interquartile range [IQR], 9) for early, 81.5 days (IQR, 69.5) for midterm, and 4.9 years (IQR, 9.4) for late complications. Main complications were infections (25.7%), wound breakdown (19.3%), and pain/discomfort (14.7%). The majority of patients (63.3%) were treated conservatively; 34.8% became inpatients with a mean hospital stay of 5.2 ± 3.8 days. Overall DRG-related reimbursement premiums approximately covered the total costs.

Conclusions:
Despite warnings regarding associated risks, cosmetic surgery tourism has become increasingly popular. Efficient patients’ referral to secondary/ tertiary care centers with standardized evaluation and treatment can limit arising costs without imposing a too large burden on the social healthcare system.